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Our History

Frazer Center is tucked away on 39 acres of old-growth forest in the heart of Atlanta. Once the estate of Cator Woolford, founder of the company now known as Equifax, these lovely grounds include the beautiful Cator Woolford Gardens.

Where It All Started

Renamed REACH in 1989 and the Frazer Center in 1999, the vision to offer research-based education, vocational support, and therapeutic intervention to children and adults with developmental disabilities remains intact. Fostering inclusive communities is the heart of Frazer’s mission.

In 1948, Anne Lane was searching for a program for her daughter Anita, who had cerebral palsy. Best practices of the day recommended institutionalization. Wanting more opportunity for her daughter, Anne Lane joined forces with her friend and civic leader Rebecca Frazer to create the Cerebral Palsy Center in 1949 in the basement of St. Luke’s Episcopal Church on Peachtree Street. Eventually the Frazers and Lanes acquired the former estate of Cator Woolford (founder of the Retail Credit Company, now Equifax), 39 acres located in Lake Claire/Druid Hills.

Frazer Center Timeline

Old photograph of Frazer Center students
1952 – Purchased Jaqueland, former estate of Cator Woolford. Relocated to Woolford mansion.
1961 – Opened Lane Building.
1975 – Federal government mandates that all children go to public schools. Cerebral Palsy Center shifts its focus to serve children under five and adults over 17.
1989 – New Adult Building dedicated. Name changed to REACH (Rehabilitation and Education for Adults and Children, Inc.).
1994 – REACH enrolls first typically developing children.
1998 – Cator Woolford Gardens dedicated.
Frazer Center sign
2006 – Frazer Center offers its first lottery-funded Pre-Kindergarten classroom.
2008 – Frazer Center adds second lottery-funded Pre-K classroom.
2016 – Frazer Center begins partnership with Trees Atlanta to restore Frazer Forest.
2017 – Cator Woolford Gardens redesigned by Cooper Sanchez.
Frazer students saying thank you
Old photograph of Frazer Center students Frazer Center sign Frazer students saying thank you