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Frazer Forest Benefits from Five Start Grant Award

Volunteers from FedEx planting new trees in Frazer Forest.
Volunteers from FedEx helping out in Frazer Forest.
A new pawpaw tree, native to this area
Volunteers from FedEx planting new trees in Frazer Forest.
Volunteers from FedEx planting new trees in Frazer Forest.
Volunteers from FedEx planting new trees in Frazer Forest.
Volunteers from FedEx helping out in Frazer Forest.
A new pawpaw tree, native to this area
Volunteers from FedEx planting new trees in Frazer Forest.
Volunteers from FedEx planting new trees in Frazer Forest.

The ongoing partnership between the Frazer Center and Trees Atlanta has been fortified by a grant from the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (NFWF). The Five Star and Urban Waters Restoration Grant Program supports the next phase of the Frazer Forest long-term restoration plan that Trees Atlanta and the Frazer Center began in 2016.

Frazer Forest was originally Muscogee territory and is part of a tract of old-growth remnants— including Fernbank Forest, Lullwater Conservation Garden, and Deepdene Park—that were protected from commercial logging. Over time, invasive species have come to threaten the forest’s large native overstory trees, shrub species, and herbaceous ground cover. With four creeks and nearly eight acres of floodplain, Frazer Forest also suffers from creek bank erosion and flooding.

With the grant award from NFWF, Trees Atlanta and Frazer Center are moving forward with a five-year management plan to restore 9.7 acres within Frazer Forest through suppression of the most pressing invasive plant species, continued maintenance, and replanting procedures to ensure the future health, functionality, and resiliency of the site.

As of May 2022, hundreds of plantings have already happened in Frazer Forest as a result of the grant award, and invasive removal is ongoing. This summer, the Trees Atlanta Youth Tree Team, a high school summer employment program, will be on board to boost the grant project. Fifty students will work on different aspects of the project, such as completing surveys of all plants in the pertinent zones; categorizing plants and compiling fun facts about the native species; finding, measuring, and estimating the age of champion trees in Frazer Forest; and brainstorming ideas for signage in the forest and possible curriculum lessons for Frazer Center’s nature-based learning program.

No part of the Frazer Forest long-term restoration plan could happen without the help of volunteers, many of whom live in the Lake Claire, Candler Park, and Druid Hills communities. The Frazer Center relies heavily on these dedicated volunteers who show up on the first Saturday of each month to put this plan into action so that generations to come will be able to access and enjoy this beautiful, old-growth greenspace. 

If you would like to be a part of the Frazer Forest restoration team, sign up to receive information about upcoming volunteer events HERE.